Delivering the transition to energy efficient lighting - Yemen

Project General Information



00938


5152

Climate change

Climate Change

V





I.                   Summary of the national energy situation

 

Yemen is country that has experienced challenges with acute poverty and is experiencing large population growth and urbanization. The country‚Äôs economy is largely dependent on oil with about one third of the GDP and almost three quarters of Government revenues coming from oil in the last decades.[1] The Yemeni population has the lowest access to electricity rate in the Middle East region with an electrification rate of 39.6%.[2] Yemen has experienced frequent electricity capacity constraints with regular rolling blackouts occurring in most cities. In 2009 the power shortages of the country reached 250 MW. Due to the state of the electricity grid, back-up diesel generators are used during grid failures. While increasing production of natural gas is expected to assist in  decreasing demand for oil, reserves of both gas and oil are expected to run out in 2040.[3]

 

These issues present an opportunity for investment into energy efficiency, allowing for decreased strain on the electricity grid. A more stable grid would allow for greater economic development and decreased use of carbon intensive fuels.

II.                Summary of the national efficient lighting situation

Public Electricity Corporation of Yemen has launched a large scale CFL distribution project. Around 500,000 CFLs will be distributed under a CDM project in residential areas.[4] To ensure a true market transformation and lock in the CO2 and electricity savings that will be achieved through the CFL distribution project, Yemen needs to establish a regulatory framework and MEPS for lighting. These standards should be aligned with global best practice. Moreover, a robust lamp quality control and an enforcement system need to be put in place to block low performance, incompliant and bad quality products from entering the market.

Special attention should also be given to reducing mercury waste from spent CFLs, especially after distributing 500 000 CFLs. Authorities should make people aware about the necessity to collect and eventually recycle the CFLs through education campaigns and the establishment of CFL collection points throughout the country. To build on the momentum generated by the CFL distribution project in the residential sector, promotion of efficient lighting in other sectors (commercial, industrial and outdoor), should also be considered.

I.                   Summary benefits of the transition to energy efficient lighting

 

The transition to efficient lighting in the residential, commercial/industrial and outdoor sectors would result in expected environmental benefits of 156 kilotonnes annual CO2 reduction. Annual energy savings would be 286 GWh, 5.1% of total national electricity consumption and 28.1% of lighting electricity consumption. The annual costs savings would be approximately 24.5 million USD.

 

 

Annual benefits of the transition to efficient lighting in Yemen

(residential, commercial/industrial and outdoor sectors)

 

CO2 emission reduction (kt)

Energy savings (GWh)

Cost savings (million USD)

156

286

24.5

 

With the phase out of inefficient incandescent lamps, the environmental benefits would be 42.4 kilotonnes annual CO2 reduction. Annual energy savings would be 78.1 GWh. The annual costs savings would be about 4.9 million USD.

 

 

I.                   Summary benefits of the transition to energy efficient lighting

 

The transition to efficient lighting in the residential, commercial/industrial and outdoor sectors would result in expected environmental benefits of 156 kilotonnes annual CO2 reduction. Annual energy savings would be 286 GWh, 5.1% of total national electricity consumption and 28.1% of lighting electricity consumption. The annual costs savings would be approximately 24.5 million USD.

 

 

Annual benefits of the transition to efficient lighting in Yemen

(residential, commercial/industrial and outdoor sectors)

 

CO2 emission reduction (kt)

Energy savings (GWh)

Cost savings (million USD)

156

286

24.5

 

With the phase out of inefficient incandescent lamps, the environmental benefits would be 42.4 kilotonnes annual CO2 reduction. Annual energy savings would be 78.1 GWh. The annual costs savings would be about 4.9 million USD.

 

 

Full Size Project(FSP)

National


Asia and the Pacific


Yemen


GEF Trust Fund

Stage Grant to UNEP Grant to other IA Co-Financing UNEP Fee Other IA Fee
PDF
$ 2,500,000.00 $ 0.00 $ 10,000,000.00 $ 250,000.00 $ 0.00


No





External



Executing Agency Category
Yemen: Public Electricity Corporation
National Government Agency

Partner Category

Name Category Period
Geordie Colville

Moderate Risk

Weak government support, which leads to inadequate and ineffective enforcement or policies and regulations. Policies might be recommended but not implemented Delayed implementation of activities that are baselines for specific incremental activities of the proposed project Low level participation from the private sector actors including lighting technology manufacturers and distributors.




0





Fiscal Year Project activities and objectives met


$ 0.00


No